© 2019 New Orleans Rowing Club

History of Rowing in New Orleans

The sport of rowing is one of the oldest sporting traditions in New Orleans. The city’s first club emerged in 1835 and the first regattas took place in 1839. By the late 1800’s, more than 30 clubs were formed as the sport gained popularity, largely with the working, middle-class.  Over the past 185 years, more than 40 clubs have existed with locations on Bayou St. John, Lake Pontchartrain, Mississippi River, Orleans Outfall Canal, and the now-defunct New Basin Canal. 

 

New Orleans has hosted national regattas and sent rowers to compete at national and international events including the Olympic Games, World Championships, Junior World Championships, World University Games, PanAM Games, Henley Royal Regatta, and the Head of the Charles. New Orleans’ rowers have also set world records and persevered through countless setbacks that threatened the existence of rowing in the city. Today, the sport of rowing is thriving through the success of the Tulane University and New Orleans Rowing Club programs. 

 

List of Rowing Clubs of New Orleans

Listed in chronological order of formation or appearance in archival research

  1. Wave Club (1835)  

  2. Lady of Lyon Boat Club (1836)

  3. The Algerine Rowing Club (1839)

  4. Ariel Rowing Club (1839)

  5. Knickerbocker Athletic Club (1839)

  6. Locofoco Rowing Club (1839)

  7. Edwin Forrest Rowing Club (1839)

  8. Washington Rowing Club (1839)

  9. Creole Rowing Club (1839)

  10. Monona Boat Club (1859)

  11. Pioneer Club (1859)

  12. New Orleans Rowing Club (1860s) (reformed 1966) (reformed 1987) 

  13. St. Johns Rowing Club (1872)

  14. Pelican Rowing Club (1872)

  15. Odalisque Club

  16. Orleans Rowing Club (1873) (disbanded 1880)

  17. Riverside Club (1873)

  18. Charles T. Howard Rowing Club (1873)

  19. Lee (R.E.) Rowing Club

  20. Atlantic Boat Club

  21. Neptunes Club

  22. Hope Rowing Club (1879)

  23. Louisiana Boat Club (1879)

  24. Perseverance Rowing Club (1880)

  25. West End Rowing Club (1880)

  26. Saratoga Rowing Association

  27. Antoine Rowing Club 

  28. Mole Rowing Club 

  29. Baldwin A. Rowing and Athletic Club

  30. Eclipse Rowing Club

  31. St. Bernard Rowing Club

  32. Independent Rowing Club

  33. Crescent Rowing Club, renamed Young Men’s Gymnastics Club (1898), renamed New Orleans Athletic Club 

  34. Bayou St. John Rowing Club 

  35. Tulane Rowing Club, renamed Tulane University Rowing Association

  36. St. John Boat Club

  37. Pontchartrain Rowing Club

  38. Vista Shores Rowing Club (1977), renamed New Orleans Rowing Club (1987)

  39. Loyola University New Orleans Crew 

  40. Memmian Rowing Club 

 

Chronological History of Rowing in New Orleans, LA

 

1835

  • Wave Club becomes the first rowing club established in New Orleans with its headquarters next to the Magnolia Bridge on the New Basin Canal, approximately five miles from Lake Pontchartrain. The club was focused on hosting rowing parties and racing appeared to be a second priority. The Club was named after the Wave, which was a highly regarded, medal-winning boat built in New York by a builder named Crolius. The Wavewas purchased and brought to New Orleans by J.B. Walton. At the time, it was common for boats with a winning pedigree to have high demand and resale value. Several boats, including the Wavewere typically used for one year by their original users then sold to clubs, mainly in the South. The Waveboat was described to be a clumsy six-oared craft forty feet in length, made from white pine or cedar, its sides flared out from the keel to the gunwale, and the whole shell scraped thin to save weight. Observers noted that the crews had to pay great care to keep the boat on an even keel. The boat used long sweep oars made from ash, scraped narrow and designed to bend “almost double”. The rowing motion was described as “pulled with a jerk at the end of the stroke, commonly called the “fisherman’s dig.” There is no record of the Wave Boat Club racing, as most of the other boats owned are described as “soft-cushioned, comfortable ladies’ barges,” designed for “a row and a dinner.” (Huber, Leonard. “New Orleans: A Pictorial History”. 1971) (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986) (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885) (Peverelly, Charles A. “The Book of American Pastimes: Containing a History of the Principal Base Ball, Cricket, Rowing, and Yachting Clubs of the United States”.1866) (Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

 

1836

  • A more competitive rowing group was organized called the Lady of Lyon Boat Club, choosing to row a few hundred yards above Algiers Point on the Mississippi River instead of the New Basin Canal. The club’s boats were named after characters in the famous play from which the club took its name. The club is described as being the “finest in the city, if not in the South.” (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986) (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

 

1837

  • In July 1837, the Picayune published an article urging young men of the city to form a rowing club due to the sports’ growing popularity in eastern cities. When one appeared the following month, the editor commended the undertaking because the city offered so few diversions in the summer: “Lazy inactivity, quarrelling, billiard playing, drinking and dueling, are about all the amusements that can be found in this city at present.” Rowing is said to have appealed particularly to middle-class youths who lacked the money and leisure to command expensive sailing boats, but who could band together to purchase rowing equipment. (Krout. “Annals of American Sport”) (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1839

  • By 1839, more clubs were founded citywide including; The Algerine, Knickerbocker, Ariel, Locofoco, Edwin Forrest, Washington, and Creole Clubs. Races were held on Lake Pontchartrain, Bayou St. John, Madisonville, and in the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Algiers on the river’s west bank. (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986) (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • On January 8, 1839, the New Orleans Daily Picayunereported that Ariel Club was defeated by two clubs from Mobile, AL in New Orleans in what was described as the “first regular regatta” in New Orleans. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • On April 8th, 1839 a second regatta was held with professional rowers for a stake of $1,000. The course was rowed two miles upstream and back on the Mississippi River, starting opposite of the Second Municipality. During the race, the Orleans boat “Thos. M. Hamblin” defeated the Mobile boat “Celeste” by one length after a back and forth battle. The crowd was described as “immense” with flat conditions. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885) 

  • On August 11, 1839, the third recorded regatta took place between the boats “Pauline,” “Gen. Damas,” and “Thos. Hamblin” in Madisonville on the Tchefuncte River. The race report depicts a “meagre” race due to a clash between “Thos. Hamblin” and “Gen. Damas” at the start of the race. “Pauline” is described as taking the lead easily during a “war of words” between the other crews. After the race, the coxswain of the “Thos. Hamblin” was reportedly received a severe verbal “mauling.” (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

  • Lady of Lyons selected William E. Chambers of New York to construct a six-oared shell, “one that cannot be beat,” at a cost of $275. However, the depression of the 1840s, said one member, caused a “scarcity of money in this city as well as in yours” and made it difficult for the club to pay for the boat. Members raised money by selling an old shell to the Vicksburg Boat Club. (Letters from Lady of Lyons Boat Club book, Special Collections, Tulane University Library)

 

1840

  • On April 26th, 1840, a regatta between four clubs including Knickerbocker, Locofoco, Edwin Forrest, and Algiers took place on the Mississippi River, on the Gretna bank to avoid a large amount of driftwood that was present on the river due to high waters. The crowd was described as, “the largest ever seen on the banks of the river.” The trophy was described as “handsome solid silver cup in the design of a boat supported on rests.” The Algiers Club won the approximately two-mile race in 28 minutes, defeating the pre-race favorite – Knickerbocker Athletic Club. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

  • On May 17th, 1840, boats from Knickerbocker, Lady of Lyons, Edwin Forrest, and Algerine Club raced at the Prairie Cottage on Lake Pontchartrain, near the terminus of the Nashville Railroad. The boat, “Water Witch,”from Lady of Lyons won the race by two lengths. The race featured several equipment breakages but also saw all crews draw even with just a few hundred yards left in the race. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

  •  On May 24th, 1840, boats from Knickerbocker, Algerine, Edwin Forrest and Locofoco again raced on Lake Pontchartrain, this time in much rougher conditions. Edwin Forrest Club won the race by several lengths, although all boats were nearly “swamped.” (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

  • On June 31st, 1840, an amateur regatta was held on the Mississippi River opposite the Willow Grove Hotel in Algiers. Boats raced in a best of three format with the “Water Witch,” boat from Lady of Lyons winning the regatta. This was the last regatta in New Orleans until 1848. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

  • By 1840, transportation from downtown to regattas held at Lake Pontchartrain was possible via the New Basin Canal which extended for six miles from the lake through the upper parts of the city, the town of Carrolton, and ended where is now the Amtrak station. Passengers were carried by means of barges, powered by mules, with service beginning three times daily and six times on Sundays. As of 1840, this trip cost twenty cents. (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986)

 

1843

  • On May 16th, 1843, a regatta featuring Lady of Lyons, Algerine and several other clubs raced in what is believed to be the only race in 1848 and the last race in Louisiana before the start of the Civil War. The Lady of Lyons boat was victorious, winning a silk flag. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

 

1844

  • A devastating river flood destroyed most of the boathouses and equipment in the City, with much of the damage near Algiers Point. The damage discouraging organized rowing for the next fifteen years and many oarsmen turned to yachting.(Labarre, Delia. “The New Orleans of Lafcadio Hearn: Illustrated Sketches from the Daily City Item”. 2007) (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986)

 

1850

  • Despite inactivity due to the flood in 1844, the sport of rowing was still at the center of sports media attention. The Daily Crescentreported that “of all the spectator sports popular in New Orleans, none save horse racing attracted as many viewers as the rowing and sailing regattas at the lake.” (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986) 

 

1859

  • Rowing activity returned to Lake Pontchartrain with the formation of Monona Boat Club which was situated on the Railroad Wharf near the lighthouse. The club used a four-oared barge made by local, and veteran boat builder, John Mahony. Boats are said to have been launched by lowering through a well-hole in the floor of the boathouse. The club inaugurated a series of intraclub races on Lake Pontchartrain. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885) (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • Due to the initial success of Monona Boat Club, another club was formed on Lake Pontchartrain called Pioneer Club. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

 

1860

  • On August 30th, 1860, Pioneer Club and Monona Boat Club raced on a 2 2/3-mile course on Bayou St. John after building up a bitter rivalry between each other. Pioneer raced with a boat made in Pittsburgh while Monona raced one of John Mahony’s handcrafted boats, called the “Delta.”Dressed in white shirts and red caps, the Monona crew defeated the Pioneer crew, dressed in blue jackets and white caps, by eighteen to twenty lengths in 22 minutes 45 seconds.  Urging residents to go to the lake for the race, the Crescent assured people that rowing was “an aquatic sport, bringing out muscle and science, quite as exciting as cricket and baseball on land.” After the race, the Crescent expressed hope that this “manly sport” would continue in New Orleans. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885) (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1861

  • The Civil War preempted further rowing activity in New Orleans. (Labarre, Delia. “The New Orleans of Lafcadio Hearn: Illustrated Sketches from the Daily City Item”. 2007)

 

1869

  • In April 1869, the first signs of rowing emerged after the Civil War when a white “yawl” was launched on Bayou St. John. During this time, it is believed the present-day New Orleans Rowing Club was formed on the Mississippi River, opposite the Shippers’ Press. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885) (Yaldo, Curtis. “Visitor’s Guide to New Orleans. November, 1875”.1875.)

 

1872

  • Rowing officially resumed in the City of New Orleans in the summer of 1872 when some of the city’s “first and best young men” formed the St. John Rowing Club and Pelican Rowing Clubs. Both boathouses were located on Bayou St. John. The St. John boathouse was located near the Harding Drive Bridge. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)(Labarre, Delia. “The New Orleans of Lafcadio Hearn: Illustrated Sketches from the Daily City Item”. 2007) (Huber, Leonard. “New Orleans: A Pictorial History”. 1971) (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”.1885)

  • The Times Picayune reported large crowds on the banks of Bayou St. John for the St. John Rowing Club’s inter-squad championship that featured a race between “Emma”and “Abby”“from the island to the boathouse, distance a mile and a half, for the championship.” Both boats were constructed by local boat builder, John Mahony. 

 

1873

  • The Orleans Rowing Club was founded by employees of the city’s cotton presses.(Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • Similarly, the Riverside Club was founded drawing most of its members from the local metal foundries. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The Howard Club was formed. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

  • The Louisiana Rowing Association was formed to regulate rivalries between clubs post-war. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1874

  • The success of St. John Rowing Club and Pelican Rowing Club encouraged more clubs to form. By 1874, at least a dozen clubs existed in New Orleans, with an additional two clubs forming every subsequent year. The New Orleans’ black community also established Antoine Rowing Club which organizes races in the Saratoga Rowing Association. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Aiello, Thomas. “New Orleans Sports: Playing Hard in the Big Easy”. 2019)

  • Rowing clubs invested heavily in equipment, with some clubs owning more than thirty boats including singles, doubles, fours, gigs, and wherries. Local boat builders like John Mahony, “the prince of boat builders,” were influential in providing equipment. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • Although purchasing equipment and maintaining the fleets was expensive, the cost to individual members of rowing clubs in New Orleans was minimal. It is said that the New Orleans Rowing Club received only $2 per month from each member, yet the club spent hundreds of dollars each year for boats, maintenance, and a boathouse.(Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • On July 16th, 1874, the Times Picayune announced the Riverside Club’s record setting time at the Pelican Club’s Annual Regatta on Bayou St. John. The Orleans, Pelican, and Riverside Clubs brought a crowd that was “far greater than on any previous occasion. The houses of the St. John and Pelican Clubs were covered with their guests; the two bridges held over a thousand, whilst the rows that covered both sides of the bayou must have swelled the total to at least five thousand.” Pelican Club defeated Orleans in the first race, then Riverside defeated Pelican Club in the second race. Riverside defeated Pelican Club again in the finals in what was called, “the best time ever made on the bayou,” covering a distance of two miles. 

  • On September 14th, 1874, the Louisiana Rowing Association was controversially disbanded after a regatta was held on Carrolton at the same minute as a bloody conflict between police and citizens on the levee, resulting in accusations that the regatta participants were involved. (Coleman, William H. “Historical Sketch Book and Guide to New Orleans and Environs: With Map, 1885”. 1885)

 

1875

  • The New Orleans DailyPicayune described the members of Pelican Boat Club to be “many of our first and best young men, full of vim and ambition, and determined to make for themselves a reputation in the rowing arena.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The New Orleans Daily Picayunealso described the St. John Rowing Club’s as “a club of high social standing – perhaps the highest occupied by any club in New Orleans. Its members are chiefly young gentlemen of polish and attainments and fashionable proclivities whose associations are with the first people of the city.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • St. John Rowing Club hosted an elaborate regatta that attracted outstanding rowers from New York, Chicago, Detroit, Charleston, Galveston, Mobile and small towns in Michigan and Iowa. The events won the club an impressive amount of coverage in newspapers and sporting journals throughout the United States.(Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The Louisiana Amateur Rowing Association was formed to regulate and sponsor races for the state championship. The association was disbanded in 1875. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • Rowing was so popular, and oarsmen were so revered by women that rowing terminology entered the dating world. On August 15th, 1875, the New Orleans Bulletin reported that “young women no longer ask for an arm; it is, ‘Give me your starboard oar, please.’ …In the evening, not a waltz, but a ‘double-scull race’ is suggested.”  Many women desired to hold the arm of an oarsman – and this lasted for quite some time. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1877

  • James O’Donnell from Hope Rowing Club traveled to the Detroit Regatta where he placed second in the single-scull race. This marked the first time a New Orleans rower traveled outside the city to compete in a race. Upon his return to New Orleans, his club welcomed him with a band and a second line through town. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The St. Johns Rowing Club relocates to the West End at Lake Pontchartrain with the advantage of rowing in the Lake and the New Basin Canal. A boathouse was constructed with porches on three sides. (Campanella, Catherine. “Lost Lake Pontchartrain Resorts & Attractions”.2019) (New Orleans Museum of Art. “Arts Quarterly: October/November/December 2007: Volume XXIX Issue 4”.2007)

 

1878

  • Rowers, O’Donnell & Powers, from Hope Rowing Club won the national double-scull championship at the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen held in Newark, NJ. The duo completed the straight 1.5-mile course in 8 minutes, 37 ¼ seconds. During the press release, the Wilkes’ Spirit of the Times declared“The ‘Solid South’ were universal favorites, and their success was extremely popular.” The sport of rowing was regarded as a great benefit to a country recently torn by civil war.  (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Janssen, Frederick William. “A History of American Amateur Athletics and Aquatics: With the Records”.1887)

  • The New York Sun supported rowing’s influence on post-Civil War unity by reporting, “Intense excitement existed among the thousands on the banks, who cheered the Southerners as warmly as the others.” At the presentation of the prizes, a representative of the national association said that, “of course all could not win; but he was glad our friends from Dixie had carried off something.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1879

  • On June 19th, 1879, the Times Picayune covered the second day of the Hope Rowing Club’s regatta between Hope, Perseverance, Atlantic, Robert E. Lee, Eclipse, and Riverside Clubs. The event consisted of three races; the double scull, the four-oared barge, and the four-oared shell. It was a beautiful day, with water like “glass,” and “an immense concourse of people at an early hour assembled […] and crowded every available place from which a view of the course could be commanded.” Hope Rowing Club swept all three events.

  • On August 29, 1879, the Louisiana Boat Club was organized with an active membership of 67. (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

  • Competition among clubs assumed many forms including interclub matches, anniversary regattas, and state championships. But local oarsmen also had opportunities to compare skills with rowers from other sections including the Northeast and Midwest, and rowers from other sections also traveled to New Orleans to compete. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • Frank J. Mumford, the proclaimed “Champions of the South” was the most decorated oarsmen in the late 1870s and early 1880s. He won the senior single-sculls championship at the regatta of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen in 1879 representing Hope Rowing Club. Mumford is said to have won the race off of a disqualification from F.E. Holmes whom “a great deal of money had been place.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Janssen, Frederick William. “A History of American Amateur Athletics and Aquatics: With the Records”.1887) (Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

  • The Pelican Rowing Club is described as having “a fine boat-house, five boats, thirty-five members.” (“Bretano’s Aquatic Monthly and Sporting Gazetteer”.1879)

  • On September 10th, 1879, the New Orleans Daily Democrat reports on the Howard Regatta held on Lake Pontchartrain between Howard, Atlantic, and Hope Rowing Clubs. Two thousand were in attendance. (The New Orleans Daily Democrat, September 10, 1879)

 

1880

  • The Orleans Rowing Club disbanded in 1880. (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

  • Frank J. Mumford repeated his title as senior single-sculls champion, this time with the newly formed Perseverance Rowing Club, at the National Association of American Oarsmen Regatta in Philadelphia, PA. Both Hope Rowing Club and Perseverance Rowing Club were composed primarily of city firemen and cotton weighers. After Mumford’s victory, the Wilkes’ Spirit of the Times called him “the finest oarsman who has ever pulled in the Association.” (Janssen, Frederick William. “A History of American Amateur Athletics and Aquatics: With the Records”.1887) (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The National Association of Amateur Oarsmen (NAAO) arranged for a committee to investigate Frank J. Mumford’s supposed “hippodroming of races in the interest of poolroom gangs.” He was subsequently suspended but pardoned in 1881. 

  • The West End Rowing Club was formed composed mostly of members from the disbanded Orleans Rowing Club. (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

  • St. John Rowing Club hosted a similar regatta to the one held in 1875, attracting competition from all over the country. At the prize ceremony to award the winners from Hillsdales (MI), Cohoes (NY), Pensacolas (FL), Neptunes (LA),  and St. John (LA), Congressman R.N. Ogden assured rowers that “these are the contests we desire, contests of manly skill, and prowess, embittered by no sectional prejudice, inflamed by no political animosity, contests of brotherly love, where the best man wins.” The course was a simple, straight, one and a half mile with four events. Hillsdale won the double scull, Gus Soniat from St. John won the junior single scull, St. John won the four-oared wherry, and Neptunes beat Pelican in the four-oared barge. Local clubs Orleans, Louisiana, and Riverside also competed in the event. A crowd of five thousand spectators attended the regatta, culminating in a fireworks display. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Campanella, Catherine. “Lost Lake Pontchartrain Resorts & Attractions”.2019)

  • A June 4th, 1880, the New Orleans Daily Picayune article claimed that women were weak for rowers: “Women, who are by nature weak, delight to gaze upon the evidences of strength in the other sex. The brawny arm and sinewy frame, which the oarsmen develop to the utmost, are objects of the deepest admiration to them. The victor in the athletic struggle finds his sweetest reward in the bright glance and smiles of approval from their eyes and lips.” When a fine woman is a winner’s prize, a man finds himself with no other want or need of motivation (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1881

  • The Pontchartrain Regatta Association was formed. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The West End Rowing Club built a two-story boathouse with reading room, bathroom, ladies’ parlor, main room for boats and equipment, and dressing rooms for the 160 members. (Campanella, Catherine. “Lost Lake Pontchartrain Resorts & Attractions”.2019)

  • Despite the strict adherence of all four amateur rowing associations, Frank J. Mumford from Perseverance Rowing Club was barred from amateur competition “for rowing crooked”, presumably violating the amateur code of conduct. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1883

  • As of 1883, the following clubs held membership with the Mississippi Valley Amateur Rowing Association; St. John Rowing Club, Perseverance Rowing Club, and West End Rowing Club. (Janssen, Frederick William. “A History of American Amateur Athletics and Aquatics: With the Records”.1887)

 

1884

  • On August 12th, 1884, the Daily Picayune confirmed that Frank J. Mumford, who was known as the city’s best rower, had been disqualified by the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen (NAAO) “for rowing crooked.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1885

  • St. John Rowing Club again hosted an elaborate regatta attracting clubs from all over the country. The club constructed a grandstand that seated five thousand spectators and featured a bar and poolroom. However, the public preferred local and state championship races to intersectional competitions. Thus, the 1885 regatta ended as a financial failure, and the club abandoned its efforts to promote intersectional competition. The grandstand was not maintained and left to rot. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Labarre, Delia. “The New Orleans of Lafcadio Hearn: Illustrated Sketches from the Daily City Item”. 2007)

  • In June 1885, West End Rowing Club hosted its fifth anniversary regatta with as many as ten to fifteen thousand spectators in attendance. The Picayunereported, “A great many ladies graced the club house balcony, and the oarsmen had the additional encouragement of a band of music, which played lively airs at the start and finish of each race.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • On May 25th, 1885, the International Rowing Regatta is held in New Orleans on a 1 ½ mile course with a turn. The amateur double sculls event was won by Delaware Club, with Galveston in second, and Perseverance Club in third, fourth, and fifth. The four-oared shells event was won by St. John Rowing Club in 10 minutes 44 seconds. The amateur single sculls event was won by Morgan of Eclipse Rowing Club in 11 minutes 1 second. The junior single scull event was won by Bradbury of Hope Club in 12 minutes 47 seconds. The amateur fours event was won by Galveston against Hope Club, St. John, Riverside, and Eclipse. Galveston beat Hop by 10-lengths. (The Wheelman Co. “Outing: An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of Recreation, Volume 6”. 1885)

 

1890

  • In May 1890, the West End rowers announced plans, “to make the club as prominent in social affairs as it is in boating, so that those who have not time nor inclination for rowing will find leisure in the attractions offered.” Both West End and St. John showed little interest in the comfort of spectators at regattas. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

1893

  • The Pontchartrain Regatta Association was disbanded in Spring 1893.(Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

  • The Southern Amateur Rowing Association was founded in Spring 1893 by the St. Johns Rowing Club and Louisiana Boat Club. Member clubs also included; West End Rowing Club, Tulane Rowing Club, Young Men’s Gymnastics Rowing Club and the Southern Racing Club (Pensacola, FL). All regattas were held on Lake Pontchartrain except for those in 1898, which were held in Pensacola, FL. Clubs competed for the “Southern Championship.” (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900) (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • Oarsmen from clubs included in the Southern Amateur Rowing Association maintained an “amateur” status which defined amateurs as “any person who has never competed in any open competition for money, or under a false name, or with a professional for any prize, or where gate money is charged, nor has ever, at any time, taught, pursued, or assisted in athletic exercises for money of for any valuable consideration.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

 

 1894

  • The Louisiana Boat Club won 13 of 16 medals offered at the Southern Amateur Rowing Association regatta including the championship four. (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

 

1895

  • James Harris of Louisiana Boat Club won the Junior and Senior Single Sculls at the Southern Amateur Rowing Association regatta. (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

 

1898

  • The Crescent Rowing Club was reorganized into the Young Men’s Gymnastics Club’s Rowing Club, a branch of the Y.M.G.C. of New Orleans (now known as the New Orleans Athletic Club). The club house was built on Bayou St. John at the terminus of Esplanade Avenue. (Righton, Henry. “Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana”.1900)

  • Oarsman Constance (C.S.) Titus is “beaten easily” at the national single-scull championship. He was described as “not a natural oarsman but possessed strength,” having learned to row in New Orleans in the previous few years. (Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

 

1900

  • Oarsman Frank J. Mumford, the best rower in New Orleans during the late 1870s and early 1880s, died due of pneumonia while training for a race. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • The Southern Amateur Rowing Association was disbanded. This also marked a loss of interest from residents in the sport of rowing. Other sports, such as baseball, summoned spectators and participants. In particular, rowers from the working and lower middle classes abandoned the sport, thus allowing the upper levels of society who showed little desire to revive popular enthusiasm for the sport. The St. John club’s grandstand had “rotted away.” (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • On July 21st, 1900, F. Demourelli of Young Men’s Gymnastics Rowing Club won the intermediate single sculls in 9 minutes, 33 ¼ seconds at a distance of 1.5 miles at the National Championship hosted by the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen on the Harlem River Speedway Course in Harlem, NY.(Whitney, Caspar. “Outing: An Illustrated Monthly Magazine of Sport, Travel, and Adventure. Volume 36”.1900)

 

1901

  • Oarsman Constance (C.S) Titus, representing Union Boat Club of New York, won the senior single-scull national championship at the National Regatta. Titus was coached by legendary New Orleans oarsmen, Frank J. Mumford. Although Titus spent much of his time in Princeton, NJ, and New York, Titus trained in New Orleans during the early 1890’s. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

 

1902

  • Constance (C.S.) Titus successfully defended his national championship in the championship single scull at the National Regatta. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972) (Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

  • Constance (C.S.) Titus competed in the Diamond Challenge Sculls at the prestigious Henley Royal Regatta at Henley-On-Thames, England. Titus beat Lou Scholes of Don Rowing Club in the first heat, W.W. Field of Oxford in the second heat, but was defeated by F. S. Kelley of Balliol in Oxford who went on to win the Diamond Sculls trophy.(Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

 

1903

  • Constance (C.S.) Titus’ entry to the Diamond Challenge Sculls event at the Henley Royal Regatta was refused. (Crowther, Samuel. “Rowing and Track Athletics: Rowing”. 1905)

 

1904

  • Clubs from New Orleans sent multiple athletes to the third modern Olympics which were held in St. Louis, MO. This was just the second time rowing was featured at the Olympics since rowing was cancelled at the first Olympics in 1896 due to inclement weather. The 1904 Olympics featured mostly U.S. and Canadian athletes. Constance (C.S.) Titus placed 3rdin the Men’s Single Scull event. John Wells and Joseph Ravanack from Independent Rowing Club in New Orleans placed 3rdin the Men’s Double Scull event.

 

1906

  • Constance (C.S.) Titus won his third national championship in the single scull. Soon after, Titus settled in as the first rowing “coach” for Princeton University. (Somers, Dale. “Rise of Sports in New Orleans, 1850-1900”.1972)

  • On May 24th, 1906, the 34thAnnual Regatta is hosted by the St. Johns Rowing Club on Lake Pontchartrain on the West End course. The “water was rough, but the racing was spirited, and was watched by a large crowd of club members and friends.” (Wadsworth, Warren. “Fore’n’Aft: Volume 2”.1906)

 

1909

  • The Tulane University Newcomb Athletic Association establishes the Tulane Rowing Club in addition to basketball, tennis and track and field. 

 

1914

  • In May 1914, Pontchartrain Rowing Club hosted its first regatta on the New Basin Canal.

 

1915

  • The Times Picayune covered the final race of the amateur season in an article titled, “St. John Rowing Club Eight Again Defeats Pontchartrain.” This was the fourth time the two teams faced each other, but Pontchartrain’s 1912 record still stood. Fans expected a battle in which records would be broken, and so spectators lined the two-mile course. St. John won the race be a considerable amount, but both teams “forgot their difficulties of the afternoon and made better of a banquet at Spanish Fort.”

  • In September 1915, a hurricane destroyed the St. John Boat Club boathouse at the mouth of the New Basin Canal. This further weakened interest towards the sport of rowing in New Orleans which gradually diminished through the beginning of the twentieth century. (Huber, Leonard. “New Orleans: A Pictorial History”. 1971)

 

1921

  • The Southern Yacht Club defeated Pontchartrain Rowing Club during a benefit football game held in the Tulane University stadium for the annual Times-PicayuneDoll and Toy Fund. Famous Tulane football coach, Clark Shaughnessy, coached the Southern Yacht Club and was awarded an honorary lifetime membership to SYC.

 

1927

  • A fire destroyed Pontchartrain Rowing Club’s boathouse. (Huber, Leonard. “New Orleans: A Pictorial History”. 1971)

 

1928

  • St. John Rowing Club’s boathouse on Bayou St. John was demolished by City Park as part of the beautification program. (Huber, Leonard. “New Orleans: A Pictorial History”. 1971)

 

1936

  • The Times Picayune announced that New Orleans would return to the rowing scene on July 21, 1936 in the New Basin Canal. Pontchartrain Rowing Club hosted a ½ mile race with four events; a novice and junior wherry, senior doubles, and senior four-oared shells. Pontchartrain Rowing Club hosted two additional races later in 1936.

  • The Sugar Bowl Regatta, which started as a sailing race in 1934 and held annually on Lake Pontchartrain, added the sport of rowing as an event in 1936. Rowing at the Sugar Bowl Regatta was considered an adjunct sport and was described to attract “spectators [who] would line the levees for several miles. Some would ride the West End street-cars as they frolicked along the tracks following the races.” (Scheib, Flora K. “History of the Southern Yacht Club”. 1986)

 

1940

  • Tulane University’s Jambalaya Yearbook highlights the rowing team as part of university’s intramural sports offerings. 

 

1950

  • The final section of the New Basin Canal, where several rowing clubs were located in the late 19thcentury, was filled in to create the Pontchartrain Expressway and West End Boulevard.  

 

1966

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club was reestablished after a period of inactivity when the New Basin Canal was filled in in 1950. The club colors are red, white, blue and yellow with the motto – Laissez Les Bon Temps Ramer (Let the Good Times Row!)

 

1976

  • Tulane alum Raoul P. Rodriguez, MD acquires a new fiberglass Shoenbrod four with coxswain racing shell and brings rowing back to Bayou St. John at the site of the Vista Shores Club. Rodriguez had rowed in his native Cuba and was excited to introduce rowing to his four sons and the New Orleans community. 

 

1977

  • Vista Shores Rowing Club is formed. Most of the coaching is provided by Rodriguez with the assistance of Bill Kerins, a former Harvard University rower.  

 

1978

  • With the approval of Vista Shores Club, Rodriguez funds the construction of the first phase of a boathouse to store small boats. With the assistance of all crew members, the boathouse is constructed on club property. The club provides a 99-year lease to Vista Shores Rowing Club at a cost of $1 per year. Exterior sheeting is contributed by VSRC club member Frank Bell of Bell Roofing, and electric power is contributed by Vincent Echegarrua. A second fiberglass Pocock 4+ racing shell is acquired.

  • In September 1978, VSRC hosts the first regatta and invites a team from Miami, FL, the Cuban Rowing Academy, to compete in an Open 4+ and a Junior 4+ regatta. CRA wins both races that cover the 850-meter distance from Filmore Bridge to the boathouse. Dr. Carlos Hernandez a former regatta official in Cuba presides over the races and awards trophies to the winners named in his honor. 

 

1979

  • VSRC’s junior program expands to include junior 16-under and 14-under crews and competes in races in Miami, FL. In September, VSRC avenges their loss from the year before to earn the Carlos Hernandez trophy. 

  • Rodrigues funds the expansion of the boathouse to accommodate eight-man shells necessitated by the increased interest in VSRC. Construction of the second phase of the boathouse is again provided by club members. 

 

1980

  • VSRC wins the Southeastern Rowing Championships in the 18-under 4+ regatta held in Tampa, FL earning the right to compete in the trials for the Junior World Championships held in Occoquan, VA. VSRC finishes 4thbehind the winners from Upper Marion, PA. 

  • In December 1980, the club hosts the Sugar Bowl Regatta between a crew from the University of Virginia and VSRC. Chuck Colgan, a senior USRA referee from Philadelphia, PA, officiated the regatta. VSRC wins the main 4 with cox event. 

 

1981

  • Vista Shores Rowing Club competes in the Southeastern Rowing Championships in Tampa, FL. In the Open 4+ regatta, VSRC junior crew beats Florida Institute of Technology plus several college crews in a photo finish. In the Junior men’s 4+, VSRC wins over the team from Winter Park, FL. 

  • At the trials for the Junior World Championships, VSRC improves its finish from the year before finishing 2ndfailing to qualify. 

  • At the National Olympic Sports Festival in Syracuse, NY, VSRC representing the South team finishes 2ndto the West team represented by the Oakland Strokes. 

  • At the Junior National Championships in Buffalo, NY, the VSRC crew wins the junior men’s 4+ regatta. 

  • The 2ndSugar Bowl Regatta is held between VSRC and a crew from Oak Ridge, TN. VSRC defends its title from the year before. 

 

1982

  • Ricardo Rodriguez was invited to compete in the first junior level men’s selection camp held in Philadelphia, PA to for the Junior Men’s 8+ to compete in the Junior World Championships. Ricardo was selected to stroke the US boat which went on to win a silver medal in Piediluco, Italy. 

 

1985

  • Dr. Rodriguez and his sons Raoul, Ricardo and Roberto form the Tulane Rowing Club which then hires Robert “Bob” Jaugstetter as coach. Prior to coaching, Coach Jaugstetter won a silver medal as a coxswain in the Men’s Eight at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, CA. Tulane’s rowing program is formed out of Vista Shores Rowing Clubs’ boathouse and trains on Bayou St. John. 

  • Tulane competes in the first Mardi Gras Regatta on its home course finishing ahead of a crew anchored by legendary rower, Andrew Sudduth, an accomplished elite US rower from the 1980’s. 

  • Tulane competes at the annual Southern Intercollegiate Rowing Association (SIRA) regatta in Oak Ridge, TN and Dad Vail regatta in Philadelphia, PA. 

 

1986

  • Tulane competes at the Augusta, GA collegiate regatta, in a dual race versus Florida Institute of Technology, and the annual SIRA regatta in Oak Ridge, TN. At the Dad Vail regatta in Philadelphia, PA, Tulane finishes in the petit final of the men’s 8+. 

  • Tulane’s Raoul and Ricardo Rodriguez compete at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) regatta on Onondaga Lake in Syracuse, NY winning a national championship in the men’s 2- race. 

  • Tulane’s Raoul Rodriguez qualifies for the US National Team and competes in the men’s pair with coxswain race in Nottingham, England. 

 

1987

  • Tulane’s Ricardo and Roberto Rodriguez compete at the Intercollegiate Rowing Associations regatta on Onondaga Lake in Syracuse, NY winning a second national championships for Tulane in the men’s 2- race. The Rodriguez brothers would then win the trials race in the coxless pair in Indianapolis, Indiana earning the right to represent the United States in the World University Games held in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. 

  • Tulane’s Raoul Rodriguez qualifies for the US National Team and competes in the men’s coxed four race in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

  • Due to difficulties it faced in obtaining liability insurance, Vista Shores Club asks Vista Shores Rowing Club to change its name to New Orleans Rowing Club, thus reestablishing the former club.

 

1988

  • Tulane’s Raoul Rodriguez qualifies for the US National Team in the men’s coxless four that competed at the 1988 Olympic Games held in Seoul, South Korea. His crew finishes second to a crew from East Germany. 

  • Tulane’s Sean Curran, Raymond O’Neal, Chris Sheehan, and Roberto Rodriguez competed in the Visitors Challenge Cup men’s coxless four event at the Henley Royal Regatta at Henley-On-Thames, England. They won their initial race against the University of London but failed to advance.  University sent a Men’s coxed four to the prestigious Henley Royal Regatta at Henley-On-Thames, England. 

 

1989

  • Due to a restriction on coaching launches on Bayou St. John, the Tulane University men’s rowing squad moved from Bayou St. John to the Orleans Outfall Canal, a straight 2.2-mile long course bounded by levee walls on the western side of City Park. Initially, Tulane and the New Orleans Rowing Club store their boats behind the Robert E. Lee firehouse. Later, Tulane secures a space from New Orleans City Park adjacent to Robert E. Lee and the Orleans Outfall Canal. 

  • Tulane Alum Raoul Rodriguez Jr. won a silver medal in the Men’s Coxless Fours event at the 1989 World Championships held in Bled, Slovenia. 

 

1990

  • Tulane University sent a Men’s Coxed Four to the prestigious Henley Royal Regatta at Henley-On-Thames, England. 

  • Oarsman Raoul Rodriguez Jr. won a silver medal in the Men’s 8+ event at the 1990 Goodwill Games held in Seattle, WA. 

 

1991

  • Tulane Alum Raoul Rodriguez Jr. won a silver medal in the Men’s Coxless Fours event at the 1991 Pan American Games held in Havana, Cuba. 

 

1992

  • Memmian Rowing Club is founded by Geoffrey Parker. The club does not have a boathouse, large boats, or any specific geographic home. The club is instead focused on competing in regattas such as Head of the Charles and USRowing Master’s Nationals. The Memmian name is based on a description in Virgil’s epic poem, the Aeneid, Book V. 

 

1994

  • Tulane University won the Men’s Novice 8+ event at the Marathon Rowing Championship in Natchitoches, LA in a record time of 2 hours 57 minutes and 27 seconds. 

 

1995

  • Tulane University’s men’s rowing Head Coach Robert (Bob) Jaugstetter serves as an Assistant Sculling Coach for the U.S. National Team’s 2015 season, including the World Rowing Championships. 

  • Tulane Women’s Rowing Head Coach Sandy Taylor spends last season training on Bayou St. John before moving club to Orleans Outfall Canal. 

 

1996

  • Shannon Woods places 3rdin the single scull at the United States Olympic Trials. Shannon, originally a D-I swimmer at the University of New Orleans (1984-88), started rowing with the New Orleans Rowing Club as a casual rower in 1993. 

  • Shannon Woods of New Orleans Rowing Club wins the Women’s Open 1x event at the Marathon Rowing Championship in Natchitoches, LA in a record time of 3 hours 14 minutes and 45 seconds. 

  • Tulane University wins the Women’s Novice 4+, Novice 8+, and Open 8+ events at the Marathon Rowing Championship in Natchitoches, LA in record times of 3 hours 58 minutes and 57 seconds, 3 hours 27 minutes and 29 seconds, and 3 hours 9 minutes 42 seconds, respectively. 

 

1997

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club is listed as having five racing shells including a 1x, 2x, 8+, 4+ and 2-. The club practiced on the 2.2-mile long Orleans Outfall Canal. (American Rowers Almanac. 1997)

  • Shannon Woods places second in the Women’s Masters 30-39 2000m event at the C.R.A.S.H. B Indoor Rowing Championships. Her time of 7 minutes 5 seconds sets a world record for lightweight women. 

 

1998

  • Shannon Woods retires from rowing due to repeated injuries to her ribs. 

 

1999

  • Memmian Rowing Club places 33rdout of 64 in a time of 19:55 in the Club 4+ at the Head of the Charles in Boston, MA.

  • Fred King of New Orleans Rowing Club wins the Men’s Currach event at the Marathon Rowing Championship in Natchitoches, LA in a record time of 6 hours 8 minutes and 22 seconds. 

 

2000

  • Tulane University’s Men’s Freshman Four with Cox finished 14that the Intercollegiate Rowing Association’s National Championship. 

 

2002

  • Tulane University’s Men’s Freshman Four with Cox finished 13thand the Men’s Varsity Four with Cox finished 12that the Intercollegiate Rowing Association’s National Championship. 

 

2003

  • Tulane University’s Men’s Open Four with Cox finished 8that the Intercollegiate Rowing Association’s National Championship. 

  • The University of Virginia defeated Tulane University by 1 ½ length in The Britannia Challenge Cup at the Henley Royal Regatta in Henley-On-Thames, England. 

 

2004

  • Tulane University wins the Men’s Open 4+ event at the Marathon Rowing Championship in Natchitoches, LA in a record time of 3 hours 0 minutes and 55 seconds. 

 

2005

  • In July 2005, Durham University “A” defeated Tulane University by 1 length in the Men’s Student Coxed Fours at the Henley Royal Regatta in Henley-On-Thames, England. 

  • In August 2005, the City of New Orleans was hit by Hurricane Katrina. Catastrophic flooding caused most of the New Orleans Rowing Club’s and Tulane Rowing Club’s boats and equipment to be damaged and/or destroyed. Due to closure of the university for the fall semester, Tulane’s oarsmen were given the option to enroll at other universities for the semester. Some oarsmen were also given a chance to row for other university programs before returning to Tulane in the Spring of 2006. A successful fundraising campaign initiated by Vespoli USA and the 1980 Olympic Rowing team raised more than $70,000 to help Tulane Rowing Club recover from the storm. (Rowing News)

 

2009

  • In June 2009, Tulane University defeated Worcester Rowing Club but was later defeated by Durham University Boat Club in the Frank Harry Cup for Senior 4+’s at the Women’s Henley Regatta held at Henley-On-Thames, England. 

  • In July 2009, John Huppi & Andrew Walker from Tulane University competed in the Silver Goblets & Nickalls’ Challenge Cup, the elite Coxless Pairs event, at the Henley Royal Regatta in Henley-On-Thames, England. The duo was defeated by Olympic champions Andrew Triggs Hodge & Pete Reed from Molesey BC and Leader RC by verdict of easily. 

  • Tulane University won the Women’s College & Club 8+ at the Head of the Hooch regatta in Chattanooga, TN. 

 

2011

  • On May 28, Tulane’s Marie-Claire Serou won the Women’s Single Scull at the American Collegiate Rowing Association National Championship held at Lake Lanier, GA. Her boat, the Who Dat survived both Hurricane Katrina and a tornado which struck the team’s boathouse on the Orleans Outfall Canal the previous season. 

  • In July 2011, New Orleans Rowing Club competed in the Britannia Challenge Cup for Men’s Coxed Fours at the Henley Royal Regatta in Henley-On-Thames, England. The crew was composed of current and former oarsmen from Tulane (John Huppi, Chris Jury, and Craig Seaman) and Louisiana State University (Jacob Privat) and were defeated by Radley Mariners RC composed of recent alumni from Radley College, England. 

 

2012

  • On September 24th, 2012, Tulane University Rowing Association and New Orleans Rowing Club moved from the northern end of the Orleans Outfall Canal to the southern end, near the I-610 underpass due to levee improvements which interfered with the former boathouses’ footprint. 

 

2014

  • In March 2014, Tulane University Rowing Association relocates to the Pontchartrain Landing facility on the New Orleans Inner Harbor Navigation Channel. 

  • Rowing activity on the Orleans Outfall Canal is abandoned to allow construction teams from the Army Corps of Engineers to complete work on the Canal’s 100-year storm protection certification. 

 

2015

  • In Spring 2015, the New Orleans Rowing Club relocated to Bayou St. John on the site of the old Tulane boathouse, which was abandoned in the early 1990s. The club’s membership consisted of primarily masters (adult) recreational rowers and the club owned just four small sculling boats. The club obtained official 501(c)3 charity status from the State of Louisiana. 

  • New Orleans Rowing Club hosted the inaugural inter-squad Time Trials Regatta on Bayou St. John between the Filmore Avenue Bridge and the Vista Shores dock at a distance of 825m. The annual event commemorates the numerous inter-squad regattas and championships held on Bayou St. John in the late 1800s.  

 

2016

  • In Spring 2016, the New Orleans Rowing Club launched a competitive junior (high school) rowing program with affiliation to the USRowing Southeast Region. 

  • The club purchases a Hudson 2x and Sykes 4x due to increased membership. 

 

2017

  • New Orleans Rowing Club’s Katherine Descant wins the Women’s Junior single scull at the John Hunter Regatta in Gainesville, GA. 

  • New Orleans Rowing Club’s master’s team returned to competitive travel racing, highlighted by John & Hannah Huppi winning the USRowing Mixed A2x National Championship in Oakridge, TN.

  • New Orleans Rowing Club acquires two Vespoli 8+’s from Embry Riddle Aeronautic University in Daytona Beach, FL and Boone High School in Orlando, FL.

 

2018

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club defeated the Tulane Men’s Varsity 4+ in the inaugural Fred King Challenge Trophy held on the New Orleans Inner Harbor Navigation Channel.  

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club traveled to Sarasota, FL for the FISA World Rowing Masters Regatta. The team won 6 trophies including a full sweep of the Mixed A events (2x, 4x, and 8+), and wins in the Men’s A4+, Women’s A2x, and Women’s B8+ events. 

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club expanded junior rowing to include separate development (middle school) and competitive junior (high school) programs. 

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club placed 4thoverall in the Men’s College & Club 4+ event and 11thoverall in the Men’s Open 8+ event at the Head of the Hooch Regatta in Chattanooga, TN. In both events, New Orleans Rowing Club was the top placing “club” boat. 

  • The club acquires a new Vespoli 8+ from Little Rock, AR, a Hudson 1x from Austin, TX, a Wintech 4x from Miami, FL, and a Maas 1x from Meridien, MS.

 

2019

  • On February 2nd, 2019, the New Orleans Rowing Club hosted the inaugural New Orleans Indoor Rowing Championships in New Orleans, LA. Competition includes rowers from New Orleans Rowing Club, Louisiana State University Rowing Club, and other individual entries from Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Races included 2000m and 500m events for junior, master, and open categories. 

  • Tulane University defeated New Orleans Rowing Club’s in the Men’s Open 4+ and Open 8+ events in the second annual Fred King Challenge Trophy, again held on the New Orleans Inner Harbor Navigational Channel. 

  • The New Orleans Rowing Club houses 28 rowing shells including (3) eights, (1) four, (2) quads, (3) doubles, (1) pair, (11) singles, and (7) training singles. The club has over 100 active members at the junior, open, and masters levels. New Orleans Rowing Club acquires a Swift 2x from Orlando, FL, a Maas 24 from New Orleans, LA, and an Alden 2x from Pittsburgh, PA. 

  • On October 5th, 2019, New Orleans Rowing Club hosts renames the annual Time Trials event, the Bayou St. John Regatta. More than 70 rowers raced in 38 events, or 165 seats, in the masters and junior categories. 

  • New Orleans Rowing Club travels to compete in the USRowing Southeast Masters Championships in Augusta, GA, Hometown Henley in The Woodlands, TX, Dogwood Junior Championships in Oak Ridge, TN, Chicago Sprints in Chicago, IL, Bayada Regatta in Philadelphia, PA, Capital Sprints in Washington, DC, First Coast Head Race in Jacksonville, FL, Head of the Charles in Boston, MA, Head of the Hooch in Chattanooga, TN, and Head of the South in Augusta, GA.